December 9, 2015
The Big Short: New Production Stills released
Gallery Movies The Big Short

The Coming Soon site released new production stills of The Big Short and you can find some of them on our gallery. Watch The Big Short in theaters in December 23.

FWBR001.jpg FWBR002.jpg FWBR003.jpg FWBR004.jpg FWBR005.jpg


December 8, 2015
The Submarine Kid: First trailer, new poster and release date
Movies The Submarine Kid

Finn Wittrock and Emilie de Ravin star in the captivating drama, The Submarine Kid, available on Digital HD and On Demand January 12 from MarVista Digital Entertainment. Co-written by Wittrock, marking his writing debut, alongside Director Eric Bilitch, the feature also stars Jack Coleman, Nancy Travis, Jessy Schram and Matt O’Leary. The Submarine Kid is a timely film that takes a unique look into one Marine’s journey through wartime post-traumatic stress disorder. Military veterans worked in front of and behind the camera lens to create the arresting drama, including Technical Advisor Jon Barton, Stunt Coordinator Matt Anderson and actor Scott Levy as Sgt. Barton, along with a host of amazing extras.

The Submarine Kid follows Spencer King (Wittrock), a U.S. Marine who has just returned home from his third tour after a difficult wartime experience. He struggles to acclimate himself back into civilian life with his family, friends, and his girlfriend, while he also deals with being haunted by an event from the battlefield. However, when he meets a mysterious woman (de Ravin) who fully captivates him, they escape into an entrancing relationship. His bond with this woman provides Spencer a new focus in which he can withdraw, creating a destructive situation from which only Spencer can save himself.

An official selection at the Napa Valley Film Festival (2015), the compelling feature will be available on Amazon, Comcast Xfinity, Google Play, iTunes, Vimeo and VUDU, as well as On Demand with AT&T, Charter, Comcast, Cox, TWC, Verizon and Vubiquity.


FWBR002.jpg FWBR002.jpg FWBR002.jpg FWBR002.jpg FWBR002.jpg


Source: Red Carpet Crash

December 4, 2015
Gallery Updates: GQ 20th Anniversary Men Of The Year Party

Finn Wittrock attends the GQ 20th Anniversary Men Of The Year Party at Chateau Marmont on December 3, 2015 in Los Angeles, California.

FWBR001.jpg FWBR002.jpg FWBR005.jpg FWBR004.jpg FWBR001.jpg


December 1, 2015
GALLERY: Scans of The New York Times & Brinson + Banks Photoshoot
Gallery Scans

We added to the gallery pictures of Ryan Gosling, Steve Carell and Finn Wittrock by Brinson + Banks and scans of The Big Short article published by New York Times last week.

A huge thanks to The Wittrock Files, the newest source in english of Finn Wittrock for the scans. Access their site here.

FWBR003.jpg FWBR002.jpg FWBR001.jpg FWBR002.jpg FWBR003.jpg


FWBR002.jpg FWBR001.jpg FWBR000.jpg FWBR001.jpg FWBR002.jpg


November 28, 2015
“AHS: Hotel” Star Finn Wittrock: Lady Gaga is a real workhorse…very, very approachable”.
American Horror Story Hotel Interviews Movies My All American

Finn Wittrock– yes you’ve seen him before. He started on “All My Children,” the soap, then made a big leap to Mike Nichols’ production of “Death of a Salesman.” He was stranded at sea with Louis Zapata in Angelina Jolie’s “Unbroken.” Right now he’s on TV playing against Lady Gaga in “American Horror Story:Hotel.” He’s also in Angelo Pizzo’s “My All-American,” and is featured in Adam McKay’s “The Big Short,” coming in a couple of weeks.

“My All American” is based on the true-life story of Freddie Steinmark, the University of Texas football legend, who died in 1971 at age 22. Aaron Eckhart co-stars as iconic coach Darrell Royal who offered Freddie a scholarship and a spot on the team despite his small size and build.

The movie has made $2.2 million since its release November 13th as an indie feature.

The role of the clean-cut, religious Freddie Steinmark is miles away from Wittrock’s best known role as the hypersexual, psychopathic character, Tristan Duffy, in “American Horror Story: Hotel” seduced by the Countess, played by Lady Gaga. 

At a press conference recently to promote the film, I asked Finn what it was like working with Lady Gaga.  He told me, “Gaga’s awesome! She’s a real workhorse. That’s something many people don’t know. She’ll be in New York accepting some award on the weekends and then on set at 7 am and you would never have known that she’d gone anywhere…I think she did a lot to break the mystique about her, by the way. Like she hangs out with the crew, she talks to them, she sings songs on set. She’s very, very approachable.”

With Tristan Duffy, the demented male model in plays in “Hotel,” Wittrock told me, “I decided to just that he was like even though it’s modern I decided that he was like Sid Vicious. He’s like a punk guy from the 80’s. I just immersed myself in the Sex Pistols and when punk was starting and listened to that music every day so you create you a history if there isn’t one already.”

So what’s going to happen to his twisted model character? “I really don’t what to tell you because you’re going to be really shocked. I can say that I have a cool transformation this year, which is something I’ve never done before.”

I asked Pizzo, the first-time director, who wrote the screenplay for the beloved sports films, “Hoosiers” and “Rudy,” if he cast Wittrock against type in “My All American” after seeing him in the gory and demented FX series? It turns out Pizzo never saw the popular Ryan Murphy show.

“I can’t watch it. It’s too creepy,” said Pizzo. “It’s not my thing. I tried when I learned Finn was in it, what was it? The Freak Show last year, and went, ‘Oh my god!’ I couldn’t get through an episode. It was like, ‘Ooh!’”

Despite Freddie Steinmark’s untimely death, he was so optimistic and goodhearted that the movie remains upbeat and inspirational. Freddie was also religious and went to mass every morning. The film, which is a weepie, should also appeal to school kids and church groups.

(I saw a nun at the press junket, which was a first. She told me she reviews inspirational films for her religious website.)

Playing someone as perfect as Freddie presented its own challenges Wittrock told me. Former team mates of the athlete would tell him, “Yeah, he was the best guy I ever knew. He’s like a perfect person.’ It’s like, oh, good, I’ll just do that. That’s why, whenever people started saying, ‘He’s such a good person,’ I would go, ‘Like, no, stop, please, stop talking,” Wittrock said. “I wanted to find out what’s underneath that.”

To prepare for the role, Wittrock, who never played football before, took an immersive football boot camp and ended up doing many of the stunts himself. 

 “I’m like his size, so when you see guys twice your size coming after you full force you realize how daunting it is and how much mind over matter it has to be to know that you’re five ten and can take down a guy that’s 6’5,” 250 pounds, and he did. And that’s what they said. These guys were like, ‘I didn’t even know what hit me and then all of a sudden I was on the ground and this little runt was hopping away.”

Asked about Austin he said he fell in love with the city just being there two months. “There is still a hippie vibe lurking around the corner,” he said. “That’s the difference between me and Freddie. It’s like he was the clean-cut sort who harkens back to the 50’s All American, you know? I probably would have been the long-haired hippie smoking weed in the corner.”


November 24, 2015
New York Times: Actors of ‘The Big Short’ Talk About the Debt Crisis, in Beverly Hills
Gallery Interviews Movies The Big Short

Besides starring in “The Big Short” — the forthcoming comic drama about the Wall Street outsiders who anticipated the subprime mortgage collapse and made a mint betting against the American economy — Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling and Finn Wittrock all have something else in common. Basically, how little they actually understood about the recent housing and credit bubble before researching their roles. “I thought I knew, but I didn’t really know anything at all,” Mr. Gosling said.

To help moviegoers understand, the director Adam McKay, adapting Michael Lewis’s best-selling book of the same title, took a lively kitchen-sink approach. He used such devices as celebrity tutorials on complicated concepts (Margot Robbie plays herself as she explains mortgage-backed securities) and Mr. Gosling’s breaking of the fourth wall. The plot itself is easily digestible: Mr. Carell’s character, Mark Baum, is a blunt-talking hedge fund manager who gets into the credit default swap business with Mr. Gosling’s flashily attired loudmouth, Jared Vennett. Mr. Wittrock’s Jamie Shipley, who is one half of a more bush-league investment team, enlists an ex-banker (Brad Pitt) to help his group capitalize on the impending crisis.

Recently, Mr. Carell, 53; Mr. Gosling, 35; and Mr. Wittrock, 31, got together in a hotel room in Beverly Hills to swap stories about power-learning Wall Street jargon, what they learned from the traders they played and being part of a cast so sprawling — including Christian Bale — that many of its members never laid eyes on one another until the publicity tour. “I still haven’t met Christian yet,” Mr. Wittrock confessed. “We were in totally different worlds.” The film opens Dec. 11. Here are edited excerpts from the conversation:

Q. Adam McKay has joked that the man who made “Step Brothers” might not be the first choice to direct a film about the breakdown of Wall Street. Did a comedy guy tackling a serious subject cause any trepidation?

Ryan Gosling His movies, they don’t even feel like movies to me — they’re friends of mine that I check in with. Like, “Hey, ‘Anchorman’! How are you doing?” To read the [script] and be a part of what is a sort of departure for him felt like even more of an opportunity. I did hear Adam liked to do a lot of improvisation, and I was nervous about that. Obviously the language of that world is very dense and specific and complicated. So I tried to have an arsenal of terms to use.

In the end, how much of the dialogue was on the fly?

FINN WITTROCK As much as we wanted. Often you’d do one or two passes as written and then sort of let loose. Then the way it was cut and shot, so many pieces were used. It wasn’t like they used the one take we improvised on or the one take we didn’t. It’s like a collage.

STEVE CARELL It was a different kind of improvisation. No one was searching for a joke, for a laugh. It was all character- and story-based. That’s where the information that we had to bone up on came into play. You have to be on point with this kind of improvisation.

GOSLING Adam really expected you to know the subject matter, too. He’d yell out things like, “Lay into him about your negative carry,” and I’d be like, [timidly] “Now?”

WITTROCK [in a tiny voice] “Can I look at my notes real fast?”

That sounds daunting.

GOSLING But it also bonds all the actors in the scene, because you’re all immediately working without a net.

CARELL It forces you to listen to one another. You’re not anticipating what you have to say or going through your jargon in your head trying to get it right before it comes to you. It was fun, and very similar in certain ways to “Anchorman,” because we had that freedom to explore.

Improvisation may be a holdover from Mr. McKay’s other movies, but not the look of this one. Can you talk about that?

GOSLING He shot the movie very differently. By basically putting a couple of cameras in the corner of the room with zooms, you never knew who they were shooting or when or how. There were no marks. You weren’t aware of, “This is your moment.” You could be giving it everything you have, and they could actually be shooting someone’s hands writing something on a desk. There were no cameras between you and the actors or between you and the ideas that you were trying to express. The first scene I did was in this Las Vegas showroom where I had one line. I thought I was safe, you know? I’d say, “Here’s your key cards,” and that’s it. It turned out to be a five-minute scene, and they were always on me.

WITTROCK Wasn’t that when you met [Jeffry Griffin, the actor who played] your assistant? Wasn’t he an extra? And Adam just loved you two together and put him wherever you were, right?

GOSLING Yeah, he was just supposed to be in that one scene, but we ended up doing every scene together. [Laughs.]

Each of you spent time with your real-life counterparts. Steve, the brashly eccentric character on whom your character was based, Steve Eisman, even came to the set several times. What was he like?

WITTROCK He has no filter. I remember him going up to Hamish [Linklater] and going [brusquely], “You’re too tall to play Porter.”

GOSLING [Laughs.] On my first day, he came to set. He was standing next to Steve, and I was totally blown away by what a great job Steve was doing — just his look, the nuances, things people won’t really know, because they won’t be familiar with [Mr. Eisman’s] mannerisms. It was really impressive.

CARELL He doesn’t see himself as that brash. He’s a very charming guy, incredibly smart, but he speaks his mind. There’s no fear to him. At all. He’s the type of person that I don’t think is intimidated by any situation. He sees himself as a loner and as someone who was fighting a fight in a very solitary way. Adam asked if I’d put on some weight, because — not that he dressed poorly, but he could wear very expensive clothes and look bad. So I started eating pizza and Chinese food, and we were in New Orleans, which helped as well.

Adam Davidson of NPR’s “Planet Money” [and a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine] was a consultant on the film. What kinds of questions would you ask him?

GOSLING He’d download us with as much information as possible — even down to clothing. He was very specific about how each sect within the financial world dressed and behaved. He explained the different cliques almost like a John Hughes movie would, or maybe “Mean Girls.” What brand you wear meant something in terms of where you’re at and who you are. Zegna versus Canali. There’s a real difference, and which you wore said something about you.

All three of your characters knew when no one else did that the subprime meltdown was on the horizon. What’s it like to be play someone who is either smarter or more observant that everybody else?

WITTROCK My guy, his [real] name is Jamie Mai, said that he still has this sense of frustration that no one paid attention. They were screaming about this as loud as they could, but everyone turned a deaf ear. A lot of our guys didn’t want to use their real names for this movie — we had to change their last names. I think they felt they were burned in the process of trying to get their voices heard.

In the film, Christian Bale plays Dr. Michael Burry, a partly blind stock market investor with a penchant for gratingly loud music, flailing on his drum kit and working alone. Did any of you hear about what he was up to during his nine days of filming his mostly one-man scenes?

CARELL I was in touch with Adam before I came out to New Orleans to talk about the character. You know, “I’m trying this,” and “What about that?” And I asked, “How’s it going with Christian?” And he says, “Unbelievable. He learned to play double-kick drums.” Then I thought, Oh, so I’m up next? That was a little intimidating.

Who wants to explain in a very simple way what a synthetic collateralized debt obligation is?

WITTROCK Is this a test?

GOSLING [Groans.] Oh God.

CARELL [Takes a deep breath.] You have CDO A and CDO B, and you can combine those two and put them into a CDO C, which is then made up of CDO A and B. CDO C is the synthetic CDO. [Smiles.]

GOSLING Nice! [He and Mr. Carell high-five] [Editor’s note: That’s actually the definition of a CDO squared.]

Where do you plan to keep your hard-earned money?

CARELL My mattress.

Source: New York Times